Culture

Social Drama Reveals Cultural Codes in Communication

Social dramas are a handy means of revealing cultural codes of communication because they usually distill arguments down to cultural perspectives through emotional arguments. What I mean is, people are stripped of their generic beings and the cultural values and beliefs at their core shine through while their emotions play into the drama. For instance in Daley’s speech he immediately turns to the revered symbol of a mother, and artfully twists the professor’s challenge into an accusation of Mrs. Keane and of how well she raised her son. This happened because gender and place are key themes of the Teamsterville spoken life, and this argument was suddenly about an offense both to her in her female role, and his station as a mother raising a son fit for office.

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Culture

Cultural Codes

Cultural rules or codes of communication are at play in any interaction we observe. It’s interesting to see that it all comes down to the showing respect, or displaying authority and power (or so it seems). The same components of these rules are throughout (respect, slang/jargon, cursing, and attentiveness) just used in different ways depending on the culture and context. While interviewing co-workers, all agreed that the use of cursing in meetings would appall their mothers, however completely acceptable in the workplace. Then it was noted that if you were in a presentation to a higher up (Steve Ballmer or Bill Gates, say) or for customer (at a conference) you would refrain from cursing. This is reminiscent of the Teamster’s who’s behavior was modified in cases of asymmetrical relationships. Continue reading

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Culture

The Influence of Advertising on Magazine Journalism


Please, just call me Ms.

Ms. Magazine was the first U.S. magazine to feature prominent American women demanding the repeal of laws that criminalized abortion, the first to explain and advocate for the ERA, to rate presidential candidates on women’s issues, to put domestic violence and sexual harassment on the cover of a women’s magazine, to feature feminist protest of pornography, to commission and feature a national study on date rape, and to blow the whistle on the undue influence of advertising on magazine journalism. Continue reading

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