Culture

Negotiation: The TA vs. Students

Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement (BATNA)

The TA could stand firm, lose rapport with all students but they don’t act on it, and he goes unscathed.

Worst Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement (WATNA)

Students are pissed, will go to his supervisor and post about him on RateMyProfessor.com. The will give him a bad end-of-course evaluation. Continue reading

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Culture

Negotiation: The Simpsons

There is bad blood between the voice actors and the Fox Network because in the beginning they were paid low salaries and these were not fairly reevaluated based on the success of the show. Fox instead haggled over contracts, let them expire and therefore the actors feel as though they have been treated unjustly, without respect and as if they were expendable (though the character of the Simpsons directly is attributed to them). Continue reading

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Culture

World-Traveling: Shirking off the Arrogant Perception

Lugones asks us, in Playfulness, “World”-Traveling, and Loving Perception, to open our eyes to arrogant perception as the barrier complicating issues in trying to love and understand women (and men) across cultural and racial divisions. She offer’s “world-traveling” as a solution to breaking down these barriers, as long as one might travel with playfulness and are open to exploration of what makes one at ease in the worlds that they visit. She asserts that to failing to love (or lovingly perceive) another is to fail to identify with them. This failure, therefore, can be overcome by “world-travelling”, the epitome of putting oneself in another’s shoes. Finally, she believes that seeing oneself as a world-traveler means understanding a pluralist self, that there is no one underlying “I”. (Incidentally, Lugones’ essay reminds me of the Apostle Paul’s statement in the passage of 1 Corinthians 9:19-22: “To win as many as possible… I have become all things to all people”. Was his premise the precursor to Lugones’ concept of world-traveling?) Continue reading

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Culture

Different Voices—Women’s Self and Morality

Gilligan is arguing against the common perception that women are morally inferior. Instead she proposes two trajectories for moral development, the typical ‘justice’ track and the ‘care’ track which many women identify with. She presents us with a process of development that has three levels and two stages in each. She argues that you must give equal voice recognition to the “different” voice, the voice of care.

First Gilligan assumes that it is a moral (involving right and wrong) decision of whether or not to abort a child. Second, she makes the assumption that children have a stage of life characterized by innocence, being carefree and selfish. This concept of a childhood of innocence is actually only in recent years and predominantly in the United States.

My first main critique is that while Gilligan explores morality in decision making that the study seemed heavily skewed to religious women. I personally understand a religious woman’s perspective in making such a decision (as to whether or not she should have an abortion) but I do not understand as much the perspective of one who has not been raised with religious beliefs that condemn this action as a sin. I wonder how this would, as a variable, alter the findings of the study. It would have been nice to have a control group and to have singled out religion as a variable in the participants.

Next, I feel like this study was odd because, as discussed in class, it was female only and inherent to its design cannot be reproduced using male subjects. This means that we have no valid means by which to compare the male’s decision making process against the voice of care. In her book “Moral Orientation and Moral Development” she notes that one third of the men studied switched back and forth between the justice and care tracks, but the study she specifically devised and of which we read will never allow us to measure relativity. So, while I agree with the concept of the care track, and that many women gravitate to this track over that of justice, I cannot help but miss the opportunity to ‘globalize’ the findings in the context of both men and women. I believe it would also be interesting to add gay men to the study as well.

Finally, I would have been interested to see how she evaluated women in situation involving justice versus care. We discussed in class the social problem presented to the young boy and girl, of the woman who required medicine for her illness that her and her husband could not afford and whether or not he should steal it. I imagine my critique is a bit unfair because I’m certain she does explore this in her book.

In summary, I have to say I enjoyed reading her essay because it was an accessible reading style, she interspersed anecdotal evidence in the form of quotes from participants in the study. I also agree with her concept that there is a different track other than just that of the ‘justice’ as defined by Kohlberg (which is framed in the male perspective). I just wish that there was a way that the ‘women’s track’ didn’t appear less evolved merely by the means of having fewer stages in the development process (Kohlberg has six, Gilligan has three).

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Culture

Negotiation: June Bug Graphics

I learned that I went in setting my sites too low for what I could get in monetary compensation. I realized after we started talking about money that he had no problems with what I had thought was the best I could get – that made me suspicious and I got more. However, I didn’t realize just how much more that I could have gotten still. Overall I think that it was a good end result as he could really commit that money right then (no funky wait-and-see deals) and I got to work from home – but I was floored to find out that he could have paid me up to $160k. Continue reading

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My Face, on Gizmodo. Whoa.
Culture

Negotiation: Interviewing

“However, assuming so and acting preemptively to prevent a ‘false conclusion’ does end the story.”

In conversations I’m a over active talker. I like to express myself and talk often and much. I feel driven to make sure that the other person understands my perspective before I can accept that they will have anything valuable to offer me in terms of advice or options.

When trying to listen, I often find myself interrupting to refute a perspective – specifically to correct someone’s perspective of how they view me or the situation that we share… to correct their view of my intentions or motivation. Again, I am caught in the trap of believing that it is more important that the person, first and foremost, properly understand the situation or my perspective. I believe this happens to me because I feel that if I were to allow them to continue talking, with their words being based on misconceptions or incorrect data, then any conclusions they may come to could or would be ‘wrong’. Continue reading

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Culture

Cyborg Madness: Information, Power and Dehumanization

Haraway, in her Cyborg Manifesto, is trying to get us to think about, from a social feminism perspective with a slant of postmodernism, a future with gender free feminism through the use of a “cyborg” that is all things while at the same time being none of them. Through this perspective she asserts that the control and flow of information define power and this power is used to turn everything into production, reproduction and communication as she terms “the informatics of domination”. Haraway is trying to get us to think about how hardship brings kinship, and that this can span across race, gender and class. There is room even in the foretold dark hour for reformation through “discourses of subversion and transformation”. Continue reading

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