of Voting, Rape, Sex, and Choice… or the tale of three pebbles.

of Huskies, Pens, Pants, and Panties…

“I now don’t think we should pressure people who have chosen not to vote, as a signal in its own right.”

Buster benson

Buster Benson: I’ve been talking to a few people who chose not to vote in the recent midterms and I feel like they each made a good case for why they made that decision. As a result, unexpectedly, I think my own position on the matter has changed a bit too. I feel we have a moral obligation to give as many people the ability to vote as we can, and to make it as low friction as possible to vote in an informed, thoughtful way. But I now don’t think we should pressure people who have chosen not to vote, as a signal in its own right. It lines up with my other “empower people to make informed, healthy choices” beliefs around reproduction rights, end-of-life privileges, and use of mind-altering chemicals. Just sharing here because we rarely document when our beliefs change, and maybe if we shared things like this more we’d normalize it and encourage growth instead of fixed mindsets in our public positioning.

I have a hard time with this. I see it as a responsibility.

facbeook

I liken it to sex.
Many men agree with you—
sex is their wive’s duty,
it’s not rape and it’s not a choice.

Angela Glass

Angela Glass I don’t think I can have a serious dialogue with someone that likens voting to rape.

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Prophecy, Scriptures

I am weary, God, but I can prevail. — Proverbs 30

The earth trembles
under
three 
it cannot bear up
under
four:

  1. a servant when he becomes king,
  2. a fool when he is stuffed with food,
  3. an unloved woman when she marries,
  4. and a servant girl when she ousts her queen

The man declares, I am weary, O God;
I am weary, O God, and worn out.

“Unto Ithiel, even unto Ithiel and Ucal”
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Wife Demonstrates How to Leave Husband in 2018 Watchtower of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide Summer Convention video
Psychology, Religion

The Mental Health of Jehovah’s Witnesses

Spencer, John. “The Mental Health of Jehovah’s Witnesses.” British Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 126, no. 6, 1975, pp. 556–559., doi:10.1192/bjp.126.6.556.

The function of religion in human society is complex. The part played by religion in psychiatric disorders is even more obscure. Previous literature and theories are divided into two groups: one school believes that intense religiosity is a symptom-complex indicative of psychiatric disorder, while the opposing view is that religious belief in some way acts as a defence mechanism protecting the individual and his psyche.

The present study of 50 Jehovah’s Witnesses admitted to the Mental Health Service facilities of Western Australia suggests that members of this section of the community are more likely to be admitted to a psychiatric hospital than the general population. Furthermore, followers of the sect are three times more likely to be diagnosed as suffering from schizophrenia and nearly four times more likely from paranoid schizophrenia than the rest of the population at risk.

#braindamage

These findings suggest that being a member of the Jehovah’s Witnesses faith may be a risk factor predisposing to a schizophrenic illness. Further studies would be interesting in investigating whether pre-psychotic people are more likely to join the sect than normal people and what part (if any) membership has in bringing about such a breakdown.

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