of Voting, Rape, Sex, and Choice… or the tale of three pebbles.

of Huskies, Pens, Pants, and Panties…

“I now don’t think we should pressure people who have chosen not to vote, as a signal in its own right.”

Buster benson

Buster Benson: I’ve been talking to a few people who chose not to vote in the recent midterms and I feel like they each made a good case for why they made that decision. As a result, unexpectedly, I think my own position on the matter has changed a bit too. I feel we have a moral obligation to give as many people the ability to vote as we can, and to make it as low friction as possible to vote in an informed, thoughtful way. But I now don’t think we should pressure people who have chosen not to vote, as a signal in its own right. It lines up with my other “empower people to make informed, healthy choices” beliefs around reproduction rights, end-of-life privileges, and use of mind-altering chemicals. Just sharing here because we rarely document when our beliefs change, and maybe if we shared things like this more we’d normalize it and encourage growth instead of fixed mindsets in our public positioning.

I have a hard time with this. I see it as a responsibility.

facbeook

I liken it to sex.
Many men agree with you—
sex is their wive’s duty,
it’s not rape and it’s not a choice.

Angela Glass

Angela Glass I don’t think I can have a serious dialogue with someone that likens voting to rape.

Facebook Commenter

Yup, that’s what guys say when they convince you that just touching your vagina with their penis is okay, and when it slipped in that it didn’t count

Can I just say no, or is coercion a defacto part of your rhetoric?

Angela GLass

I also can’t engage with someone who likens voting to rape.

Another Facebook Commenter

“I think Angela is making a fair analogy here, though it might be too triggering of a topic to fulfill its purpose. Angela, is your purpose to introduce the idea of respective choices without the expectation of social pressure / other coercion tactics? If so I think there are better ways to weave that in than dropping very triggering concepts into the conversation. If so I think there are better ways to weave that in than dropping very triggering concepts into the conversation.” — Buster Benson

Shana, I love your point about how getting on the ballot is an effective means of responding to two bad choices, and am super encouraged by the fact that this is actually happening and hope it continues happening. On the other hand, since there are no white, affluent libertarians active in this thread (that I know of… maybe there are some) I don’t think that it’s effective to use them as a straw man to make the other point unless someone in that camp is interested in willing to represent their side. I think we all agree that the worst people we can imagine are worthy of rebuke, but none of the people I talked to personally seemed to fall in that camp, which makes me think we’re overly generalizing the motives and intentions of people that chose not to vote.

People who don’t vote while enjoying the privileges our democratic system provides them are like players who don’t attend practice or play in the game expecting a trophy when the team wins.

Joe Stump

How would you feel about a President who never voted but won anyway? Would you disrespect her, or marvel Joe?

Angela GLass

Angela I consider taxes, jury duty, and voting to be the basic barriers of entry for citizenship. I find people who avoid or skirt these basic responsibilities to be selfish and lazy. Kind of like a kid expecting a trophy for doing nothing. … And to be clear, I think it’s their right not to vote. It is a form of speech and expression. I don’t agree with a lot of forms of free speech and have similarly low opinions of those as well.

Joe Stump

Buster Benson via Facebook Messenger: Hey Angela! Can I ask a couple follow-up questions about the comments you made in my voting thread today? I don’t have any complaints about it, but just curious to hear your personal take on the sex/rape metaphor, and how it was connected to voting and consent and all of that. I think there’s an interesting point there but I’d like to hear your take on it.

The Watchtower of Jehovah’s Witnesses magazine poses the question under the column Questions from the Readers, How do Jehovah’s Witnesses view voting? and goes on to answer “… there appears to be no principle against the practice of voting itself…” however you’d be hard pressed to find a Jehovah’s Witness who votes. Why? One might begin to find an answer when you read the article “Maintain Your Neutrality in a Divided World” by The Watchtower Announcing Jehovah’s Kingdom (Simplified Edition) 2016.

In short, I’d surmise the Watchtower finds it easier to maintain the ‘unity’ of their ‘spirit-directed organization’ that it’s members are baptized into (instead of Father, Son, and holy spirit, as directed by the inspired ritual from scriptura) when they all gather loyal only to Jehovah and his promised New World?

They are not of the world,
— even as —
I am not of the world

I do NOT pray that you would
take them from the world… as
you sent me into the world,
— even so —
I have sent them into the world…

John 17:14-18
@tara + @ang @ ‘Current Diggs the Election’ Viewing Party 6 Nov 2008, photo @a.

I have never voted, and had never intentionally registered to vote until this year. I am adopted by the Baxley family of Charlotte, North Carolina. My grandfather, and his father, John Melvin George Baxley and Elwood Adrian Baxley are known as conscientious objectors. I was raised as a Jehovah’s Witness believing in keeping one apart from the world and we weren’t raised to want to grow up and be President. No, we’re the kids who get voted in accidentally as class president and either hide that reign, or suffer from both sides when our parents make us relinquish the honor bestowed upon us by the democratic process of our peers who considered us worthy.

UNITED STATES v. JOHN MELVIN BAXLEY was a 1942-43 South Carolina federal Court of Appeals court case which rarely, if ever, sees the light of day because it also PROVES that during WW2 that Jehovah’s Witnesses across the United States were publicly preaching that Germany and its Axis allies were going to defeat the United States and its Allies and rule over the United States, and it PROVES that Jehovah’s Witnesses often spoke favorably about Adolph Hitler and his Nazi government.

In 1942, a Jehovah’s Witness Minister in South Carolina, named John Melvin Baxley, was convicted of “aiding, abetting, and counseling” his own son, Adrian Baxley (see page 2014), and other Jehovah’s Witnesses, to violate the Selective Sevice Act, and was sentenced to 15 months in prison. The material part of the indictment charged that Baxley “unlawfully, knowingly and wilfully did counsel one Arthur Haselden, and his son Elbert Haselden, one Dave Donley, and his son David Donley, one Philip Spring, and divers other persons, … to evade service in the land or naval forces of the United States.” On appeal, the USCA affirmed the USDC decision and sentence, noting in part that, “… Baxley complains that he was prejudiced by evidence, which should not have been admitted, of his statements that he was opposed to war and all killing of human beings, that he would not salute the flag, that he had advised his own son not to fight or wear the uniform, that Germany was sure to win the war, that he would rather live under Hitlerism than the United States.

UNITED STATES v. ADRIAN E. BAXLEY was a 1943 South Carolina federal appellate court decision. In 1942, a Jehovah’s Witness named Adrian Elwood Baxley was convicted on draft evasion charges for failure to report to “Conscientious Objector” camp, and sentenced to two years in prison. Adrian Baxley refused to accept CO classification contending that he was an “ordained minister” who conscientiously objected to doing anything to support the war effort. However, Adrian Baxley supported his “ministry” by working as a farmer in the summer and as a carpenter at Fort Jackson Army Base during the winter. Conviction affirmed.

UNITED STATES v. JOHN M. BAXLEY. Interestingly, [Adrian Elwood] Baxley’s father, JOHN MELVIN BAXLEY, was also convicted and jailed for “aiding, abetting, and counseling” both his own children and others to evade the draft (see our page 2031). Testimony during his trial disclosed that John M. Baxley had been publicly predicting that Germany would win WW2, and that John Baxley had publicly stated that he would rather live under “Hitlerism” than live in the United States. Both father and son lived long lives as Jehovah’s Witness Ministers in South Carolina preaching and teaching this same/similar WatchTower Cult malarkey. TRASH!!!!

Secret Watchtower of Jehovah’s Witnesses History, Court CasesMost Jehovah’s Witnesses Refuse to Perform Work in or for the Military, Defense, or Related Industries

The Presidential Election of 2016 was the first year of my family’s next generation being eligible to vote—my cousin’s daughter expressed her frustration at her choices in a Facebook photo post of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump flashing so-called illuminati symbols. I was proud she could so clearly and simply articulate what Americans were bamboozled by… a lack of choice.

One Vote, No Choice

And America hadn’t yet woken up, yet.

I warned all my friends as I could… women for the Pantsuit Nation, men with her or Bernie, etc, but they were all so confident. We had Obama, now we were gonna have America’s first female Chief Executive Officer of the Republic, the first female President of the United States of America.

Election Day  089.jpg
Obama – We are now called to pray for wisdom for our next President.
And so happy we can… fairly early! — @obama, 6 Nov 2008, photo @jayzombie

They were wrong.

All the people for Bernie were wrong.

All the people for Hillary were wrong.

Trump ‘won‘.


👋

See Also

Andrei Zmievski’s (@a) ‘Current Diggs the Election’ Viewing Party photo journalism 

Works Cited

Standard

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.