Neon Genesis Evangelion

Netflix is streaming Neon Genesis Evangelion Spring 2019.

Evangelion is an apocalyptic anime in the mecha genre. It focuses on a teenage boy recruited by a paramilitary organization named NERV to control a giant cyborg called an Evangelion to fight monstrous beings known as Angels. The show takes place largely in a futuristic Tokyo years after a worldwide catastrophe. It also centers on other Evangelion pilots and members of NERV as they try to prevent another catastrophe.

In 2000, the first disastrous contact with the mysterious beings known as Angels resulted in the global cataclysm referred to as the Second Impact, which wiped out half of the human race. To defend humanity against future Angel attacks, the United Nations established the NERV organization in Tokyo-3 to develop giant bio-mechanical mecha known as Evangelions. 15 years later in 2015, the Angels have finally returned, and the untested Evangelions can only be piloted by specially selected 14-year-olds…

Wikipedia

Can’t wait until spring? Come over. We’ve got a digital copy of the series.

Be sure to check out The right way to watch Neon Genesis Evangelion: A guide to prepare you for the anime classic’s Netflix debut (Polygon)

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The CogSci of Sexual Harassment & PTSD

When discrimination or harassment causes PTSD, damages awarded in a lawsuit will depend on how quickly the agency rectified the relevant conduct and how long the complainant suffered.

“Sometimes sexual harassment registers as a trauma, and it’s difficult for the [patient] to deal with it, so what literally happens is the body starts to become overwhelmed,” says Dr. Nekeshia Hammond, a licensed psychologist. “We call it somatizing: the mental health becomes so overwhelming one can’t process it to the point of saying ‘I have been traumatized’ or ‘I am depressed.’ Essentially, it’s a kind of denial that when experienced for a long state can turn into physical symptoms.”

These physical symptoms can run the gamut, manifesting as muscle aches, headaches, or even chronic physical health problems such as high blood pressure and problems with blood sugar.

“In the long term, it could lead to heart issues,” says Hammond.

One needn’t be in shock or denial to experience these physical effects. Hammond adds that even patients who have confronted issues with full awareness and recognize that they are anxious or depressed can experience these problems. This is because the brain and body are inextricably linked, as Dr. Wilson explains.

“The part of our brain that processes emotions, including stress, are among the earliest to develop, and is right next to the brain stem, which deals with involuntary functions such as heart rate and breathing,” says Wilson. “When we’re stressed resources go there, which can impact cardiovascular functioning, autoimmune diseases, metabolic function, [and so on],” says Wilson. “Sometimes people think stress is in our head, but our brains are an organ like any other. It’s all very connected. Neurotransmitters found in our brains are also found in our gut. It’s a real thing: this is why we tend to get sick when we get stressed, and over time, if we’re in constant stress or if it’s too much to handle, then there are physiological consequences.”

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Dr. King — The world is in dire need of a society of the creative maladjusted.

“Be not conformed…

Originally titled, “Mental and Spiritual Slavery” the sermon was became the Transformed Nonconformist:

King realized that to solve the problems of human life, especially the deepest problems—like racism, poverty, and war—we have to become, in a sense, abnormal. We have to stop going along; we have to stop accepting what everyone else believes. We have to become maladjusted if we are at all to become creative, and find that insoluble dilemmas often are the masks for other previously unrecognized problems with simple solutions.

Martin Luther King: Depressed and Creatively Maladjusted, Psychology Today

“Many people fear nothing more terribly than to take a position which stands out sharply and clearly from the prevailing opinion. The tendency of most is to adopt a view that is so ambiguous that it will include everything and so popular that it will include everybody. Not a few men who cherish lofty and noble ideals hide them under a bushel for fear of being called different.”

“The saving of our world from pending doom will come, not through the complacent adjustment of the conforming majority, but through the creative maladjustment of a nonconforming minority.”

“The world is in dire need of a society of the creative maladjusted. It may well be that the salvation of our world lies in the hands of such a creative minority. We need men today as maladjusted as the prophet Amos, who in the midst of the injustices of his day could cry out in words that echo across the centuries: “Let justice roll down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

Originally titled “Mental and Spiritual Slavery,” this sermon was composed during King’s early years assisting his father at Ebenezer.1He later revised the sermon and gave it this title.2 King maintains that the church’s sanction of social evils such as race discrimination and economic exploitation demonstrates that it has “more often conformed to the authority of the world than to the authority of God.” He chastises the church’s tendency to retreat “behind the isolated security of stained glass windows” and rebukes ministers who have “joined the enticing cult of conformity.” In contrast, King praises “The early Christians” as “nonconformists in the truest sense” but warns that “nonconformity is always costly” and “may mean losing a job. It may mean having to answer to your six-year old daughter when she asks, ‘Daddy, why do you have to go to jail so much.’”

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute

Works Cited

“‘Transformed Nonconformist.’” Birmingham Campaign | The Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute, 1 Nov. 1954, kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-papers/documents/transformed-nonconformist.

“Draft of Chapter II, ‘Transformed Nonconformist.’” Birmingham Campaign | The Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute, 1 July 1962, kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king-papers/documents/draft-chapter-ii-transformed-nonconformist.

“Martin Luther King: Depressed and Creatively Maladjusted.” Psychology Today, Sussex Publishers, www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/mood-swings/201201/martin-luther-king-depressed-and-creatively-maladjusted.

Miller, Keith D. Voice of Deliverance: the Language of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Its Sources. University of Georgia Press, 1998.

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